Experimental Study on Mechanical Properties of Concrete with Sunflower Seed Husk Ash as Partial Replacement of Cement

  • Sumaiya Marhoon Al-Dhahli Caledonian Collage of Engineering, Sultanate of Oman
  • Aravind N Caledonian Collage of Engineering, Sultanate of Oman
  • Balamuralikrishnan R Caledonian Collage of Engineering, Sultanate of Oman
Keywords: Sunflower seed husk ash, Concrete production, Mechanical properties

Abstract

The present study depicts on mechanical properties of concrete with Sunflower Seed Husk Ash (SSHA) as partial replacement of cement. Concrete made with Ordinary Portland Cement is the most widely used material in all the countries. Hence the production of Ordinary Portland Cement is expensive and ecologically harmful. Cement industries releasing huge quantity of CO2 which pollute the environment. Structural concrete can be produced using sunflower seed husk ash to meet strength and other requirements. In this project work, various percentages of SSHA added with concrete and the mechanical properties where studied. The effects of SSHA as partial replacement of cement on concrete properties was investigated. Concrete was produced by adding various amount of SSHA (2.5%, 5%, and 7.5%). From the literature review it has been noticed that the replacement of sunflower seed husk ash in concrete was very successful in reducing of unit weight, compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and freezing-thawing resistance. But water absorption rate is increased after 28 and 90 days. Based on experimental results its physical and mechanical properties show that concrete produced with sunflower seed husk ash has great potential as a low cost lightweight building material.

Author Biographies

Sumaiya Marhoon Al-Dhahli, Caledonian Collage of Engineering, Sultanate of Oman

Department of Built and Natural Environment

Aravind N, Caledonian Collage of Engineering, Sultanate of Oman

Department of Built and Natural Environment

Balamuralikrishnan R, Caledonian Collage of Engineering, Sultanate of Oman

Department of Built and Natural Environment

Published
2017-01-31