EPH - International Journal of Business & Management Science (ISSN: 2208-2190) https://ephjournal.com/index.php/bms <p><strong> <span id="cell-7-name" class="gridCellContainer"><span class="label">EPH - International Journal of Business &amp; Management Science (ISSN: 2208-2190)</span></span> </strong>publishes a wide range of high quality research articles in the field (but not limited to) given below: Accounting, Advertising Management, Business &amp; Economics, Business Ethics, Business Intelligence, Business Information Systems, Business Law, Business Performance Management, Business Statistics, Change Management, Communications Management etc. <br><span style="font-size: 1.5em;"><strong> <span style="text-shadow: #ff6600 0px 0px 3px;">Current Impact Factor: 2.404</span></strong></span></p> en-US <ul> <li>All contributor(s) agree to transfer the copyright of this article to <strong>EPH Journal.</strong></li> <li><strong>EPH Journal</strong> will have all the rights to distribute, share, sell, modify this research article with proper reference of the contributors.&nbsp;</li> <li><strong>EPH Journal</strong> will have the right to edit or completely remove the published article on any misconduct happening.</li> </ul> editor@ephjournals.com (Naveen Malik) Wed, 11 Sep 2019 17:44:34 +0000 OJS 3.1.2.1 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 The Dilemma of Commercialising Social Service Delivery in Zambia https://ephjournal.com/index.php/bms/article/view/1549 <p style="text-align: justify;">Water supply and sanitation sub-sector in Zambia has undergone major reforms. These reforms were by and large championed by the international financial institutions (IFI) who focused on<br>privatisation of the water sector with little attention on social service delivery. The Zambian Government settled for commercialisation instead. In Zambia water supply and sewerage service<br>provision still carries a social value and every citizen should access the service regardless. The dilemma is, therefore, commercialising water supply and sewerage service delivery with a social<br>value whilst ensuring access by everyone in the urban and peri-urban that includes the vulnerable and poor.<br>This study was carried out to assess whether commercialisation of water supply and sanitation sector was achieving its intended purpose of improving the quality of water supply and sanitation<br>services delivered to the customers. It was also meant to determine whether Southern Water and Sewerage Company Limited, a commercial utility involved in the delivery of these services, was<br>financially self sustainable. The quantitative data was obtained through 500 administered on the selected consumers in the service areas of the four purposefully selected towns of Livingstone, Choma, Mazabuka and Monze, with a total response of 497. In addition 27 key informants were interviewed in an effort to get in-depth data on the commercialisation of the water sector. Further, data was collected by observation method. Secondary data comprised company annual financial reports and other publications such as water sector reports, and annual financial reports (2001 to 2016).<br>The Company could not attract the much needed private sector investment. Though service has&nbsp; improved after commercialisation coverage is not yet 100 percent in both water and sewerage. It<br>is recommended that the Southern Water and Sewerage Company Limited and the other water utilities in the country should be left to operate as prescribed under the Companies Act Cap. 388<br>if they are to attract private sector investment. Further, the Government of Zambia should concentrate on resource mobilisation (especially for investments) for the sector.</p> Charles Shindaile Copyright (c) 2019 EPH - International Journal of Business & Management Science (ISSN: 2208-2190) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://ephjournal.com/index.php/bms/article/view/1549 Wed, 11 Sep 2019 17:44:25 +0000 OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE FOR COMMERCIAL WATER UTILITIES IN ZAMBIA https://ephjournal.com/index.php/bms/article/view/1550 <p style="text-align: justify;">Water commercialization/privatization has been a controversy in Africa and world-over in urban and peri-urban areas from the time of its inception to date. Though the objectives have been good in terms of efficiencies, it has some good non-efficiencies reasons for intervention by governments and other partners such as social and political ones. Many commercialization/privatization of water utilities have been formed out of pressure either by donors or from pressure resulting from market economy. Each commercialized/privatized water utility has/had its own experience. This case study of the opportunities available for commercial water utilities in Zambia focused on investigating&nbsp; opportunities available for exploitation for Southern Water and Sewerage Company Limited and describing factors that influenced performance. The research involved a review of secondary data and discussions with key informants. The study used a descriptive approach in its investigation from 10 districts found within the service area of Southern Water and Sewerage Company Limited of Zambia. Even though commercialization/privatization has continued in other parts of the world today, the controversy or resistance had continued. Variables that were look at are from the social, economical, environmental and political dimensions. Social variables looked at accessibility and affordability; economic variables are; investment, financing, revenue collection, unaccounted-for-water, metering ratio, labour productivity, service coverage, number of connections, operations and maintenance cost coverage, hours of supply, water production and sanitation coverage; environmental variables are sewerage coverage, water quality, policy and regulations, and political variables are the government, stakeholders, civil societies etc. The result of the study revealed that social, efficiencies, environment and political variables are significant in explaining the influence of the opportunities available for commercial water utilities in Zambia with respect to Southern Water and Sewerage Company Limited. All the variables under the social, economic, environment and political are important and depend on each other if a viable water supply and sewerage company has to grow. Ignoring one of them results in social and economic problems. Despite the huge challenges identified in the water supply and sewerage, surprisingly the challenges were turned into opportunities available for business exploitation. The positive relationship among the social, economic, environment and political factors is that they all contribute to company growth. The Southern Water and Sewerage Company has to make water accessible and affordable to society in urban and peri-urban areas of Southern Province because water is a human right and has to provide water in an efficient way in order to make profit. The environment has to be<br>conducive for the water utility to operate. It also depended on partners to fund most of its infrastructure development. Therefore, growth of water supply and sewerage services would depend on the available opportunities identified from the four social, economic, environment and political factors of the water governance. Therefore, strengthening policy that would include the social, economic, environment and political factors will quickly transform the water supply and sewerage services delivery in the ever increasing<br>demand areas of urban and peri-urban of Southern Water and Sewerage Company Limited.</p> Charles Shindaile Copyright (c) 2019 EPH - International Journal of Business & Management Science (ISSN: 2208-2190) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://ephjournal.com/index.php/bms/article/view/1550 Wed, 11 Sep 2019 17:39:50 +0000