PAUL AS THE PROTOTYPE FOR MISSION AND MOTIVES AS A MEANS OF SPIRITUAL TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP

  • Samuel Otieno Oketch Africa Nazarene University
Keywords: ego-driven leadership, spiritual leadership, traditions, formal rituals, spirit, religion, apostle paul, mission, motives

Abstract

The excesses of abusive, ego-driven leadership have created a call for a more authentic and compassionate approach to leadership.  For many, the concept of spiritual leadership provides an answer to this call, and the idea of spiritual leadership is now gaining traction in both academic and popular circles.  Spiritual leadership is leadership that is yielded to the empowering presence of the Holy Spirit. The filling of the Spirit is not a permanent experience and can be repeated, and each is commanded to be continually filled with the Spirit. It is not a religion that focuses on adherence to traditions or formal rituals.  Spiritual leaders are those who are being led by the Spirit to accomplish a mission that has been assigned by the Spirit. This sensitivity to the Spirit shapes their motives and informs their methods. The outcomes of spiritual leadership reflect the “fruit of the Spirit.” When a leader is led by the Spirit, the leader’s, as well as his or her followers’ attitudes and behaviours, are characterized by love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, gentleness, and self-control. This article begins with a biographical sketch of Apostle Paul and then discusses his leadership using the integrative model of mission and motives. According to this model, the empowering presence of the Holy Spirit informed Paul of his life mission. The Spirit was also actively involved in shaping Paul’s heart and developing the pure motives that characterized his leadership. Paul’s effectiveness was always measured against the mission: Did people come to know the Lord Jesus Christ, and were their lives being constantly transformed into the image of Christ?

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Published
2019-07-30
How to Cite
Oketch, S. O. (2019). PAUL AS THE PROTOTYPE FOR MISSION AND MOTIVES AS A MEANS OF SPIRITUAL TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP. EPH - International Journal of Humanities and Social Science (ISSN: 2208-2174), 5(7), 01-15. Retrieved from https://ephjournal.com/index.php/hss/article/view/1471